academics

Chemistry

Professor: D. Weisshaar
Associate Professors: J. Duffy-Matzner, B. Eichler (chair)
Assistant Professors: B. Dey, J. Mays
Staff: B. Gustafson, D. Pullman

The Chemistry Department seeks to provide an opportunity for students to pursue a versatile, yet individualized program, in this science. Our aim is to have a program which is thorough and rigorous enough to provide the comprehensive foundation needed by the student who plans to continue on in graduate school as well as to provide parallel programs which will satisfy the needs of those preparing for careers in secondary education, medicine, dentistry, medical technology, industry, and other related fields. The Chemistry Department is on the American Chemistry Society’s list of undergraduate institutions having approved curricula in chemistry.

Chemistry majors with an interest in Physics or Chemical Engineering may wish to consider a Chemical Physics major. See the Chemical Physics major for details.

Chemistry Major:

38 credit hours
Required Courses: 30 credit hours
CHEM 120 — Introduction to Chemistry (4 cr)
CHEM 201 — Organic Chemistry I (4 cr)
CHEM 202 — Organic Chemistry II (4 cr)
CHEM 222 — Inorganic Chemistry (4 cr)
CHEM 242 — Analysis (4 cr)
CHEM 301 — Physical Chemistry I (4 cr)
CHEM — Two Elective Courses at 300-level (8 cr)
CHEM 395 and 399 do not count toward the 300-level electives.

Required Supportive Courses: 8 credit hours
MATH 151 — Calculus I (4 cr)
MATH 152 — Calculus II (4 cr)
*One year of calculus based physics is strongly recommended (PHYS 221 and 222)

ACS CHEMISTRY MAJOR:

60 credit hours
Graduates completing these requirements are approved by the American Chemical Society. The Chemistry Department strongly recommends that students preparing for graduate study complete the ACS Approved Chemistry Major.
Required Courses: 44 credit hours
CHEM 120 — Introduction to Chemistry (4 cr)
CHEM 201 — Organic Chemistry I (4 cr)
CHEM 202 — Organic Chemistry II (4 cr)
CHEM 222 — Inorganic Chemistry (4 cr)
CHEM 242 — Analysis (4 cr)
CHEM 301 — Physical Chemistry I (4 cr)
CHEM 302 — Physical Chemistry II (4 cr)
CHEM — Four Elective courses at the 300-level (16 cr)
An advanced course in PHYS, MATH, or BIOL may substitute for an advanced CHEM course on prior approval of the Chemistry Department Chair.
CHEM 395 and 399 do not count toward the 300-level elective.

Required Supportive Courses: 16 credit hours
MATH 151 — Calculus I (4 cr)
MATH 152 — Calculus II (4 cr)
PHYS 221 — General Physics I (4 cr)
PHYS 222 — General Physics II (4 cr)

Chemistry Minor:

20 credit hours
CHEM 120 — Introduction to Chemistry (4 cr)
CHEM 201 — Organic Chemistry I (4 cr)
CHEM 202 — Organic Chemistry II (4 cr)
CHEM 242 — Analysis (4 cr)
CHEM — Elective course (4 cr)
CHEM 145 may be used as the CHEM Elective course only if taken prior to CHEM 201.

Students who plan to teach in high school should declare Secondary Education as a second major. In addition, these students are encouraged to plan for flexibility by seeking certification in more than one area. For an endorsement to teach a particular subject, South Dakota currently requires that a student pass the PRAXIS exam in that subject area.

Chemistry Courses:

CHEM 102 — Trustee's Fellowship in Chemistry (1 credit)
This course is limited to those freshman chemistry majors who are distinguished scholars. It will acquaint the student with career options, with chemical instrumentation and lab assisting. Students will be allowed to serve as junior lab assistants second semester under the direction of a senior lab assistant and the professor. Students may learn FT-IR, FT-NMR, GC-MS or other instrumentation. This will prepare them for doing research right after their freshman year. Must take both semesters to earn 1 credit.

CHEM 110 — Chemistry and Your Environment (Area 3.2) (4 credits)
This course is designed for the non-science major and will assist the student in understanding the role chemistry plays in his/her life. Topics of current interest are discussed, and the chemical principles required for a more thorough understanding of them are developed. Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week.  Offered Infrequently.

CHEM 115 — Physical Science (Area 3.2) (4 credits)
This survey course explores concepts in physics and chemistry, implements the scientific method, develops problem-solving skills and encourages connection of physical science concepts to everyday life. Lab work includes hands-on exercises in both areas including written reports and some use of the computer for data analysis. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Students are encouraged to enroll as first or second year students. Cross-Listed with PHYS 115; Offered Every Spring Semester.

CHEM 120 — Introduction to Chemistry (General Chemistry Topics) (Area 3.2) (4 credits)
Accelerated course covering topics typically encountered in a two semester course, (e.g. bonding, equilibrium including buffers, stoichiometry, chemical kinetics, oxidation-reduction). Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. An honors section is available each fall semester. Offered Every Semester.

CHEM 145 — Survey of Organic and Biochemistry (4 credits)
Explores the fundamentals of organic chemistry (nomenclature, functional groups, reactions) with an introduction to biochemistry (amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, enzymes, nucleic acids and the metabolic cycles). Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Students desiring more than two semesters of chemistry will normally follow the sequence 120, 201, 202. Prerequisite: CHEM 120; Offered Every Spring Semester.

CHEM 201 — Organic Chemistry (4 credits)
This course covers nomenclature, reactions, and structure of aliphatic hydrocarbons and alcohols and introduces carbonyl chemistry, structural determination, organic spectroscopy, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and multi-step syntheses. Laboratory emphasizes separation, reactions, structural determination, and physical characteristics of organic compounds. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. CHEM 201 is the organic foundation requirement for the ACS Chemistry and Biochemistry majors.  Prerequisite: CHEM 120; Offered Every Semester.

CHEM 202 — Organic Chemistry and Introductory Biochemistry (4 credits)
This course covers nomenclature, reactions, and structure of conjugated systems, carbonyl groups, amines, and introduces structure and chemical reactions of biological macromolecules and metabolic cycles. Laboratory emphasizes applied organic spectroscopy, advanced synthetic techniques, and chemistry of biological macromolecules. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. CHEM 202 is the biochemistry foundation requirement for the ACS Chemistry and Biochemistry majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 201; Offered Every Semester.

CHEM 222 — Inorganic Chemistry (4 credits)
This is a basic inorganic chemistry course with an extension of general chemistry supportive of the lab experiences. Lecture will emphasize chemical equilibria, acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, kinetics, solid-state chemistry and the theoretical basis of complex ion chemistry. Laboratory will be centered on systematic identification of inorganic cations and anions, with some experiences in kinetics and electrochemistry. CHEM 222 is inorganic foundation requirement for the ACS Chemistry and Biochemistry majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 201; Offered Most Interims.

CHEM 242 — Analysis (4 credits)
This course covers fundamental and applied topics of modern and classical analytical methods. Lecture emphasizes statistical analysis of data, method development, equilibrium, electrochemistry, and chromatography. The laboratory experience includes a mix of wet chemical and instrumental methods with an emphasis on careful and precise quantitative work. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. CHEM 242 is the analytical foundation requirement for the ACS Chemistry and Biochemistry majors.   Prerequisites: CHEM 201 & 222; Offered Every Spring Semester.

CHEM 250 — Instrument Proficiency for Scientists (1 credit)
Each offering enables students to develop a solid foundation in the theoretical aspects and operating principles, as well as develop hands-on proficiency in the operation of the featured instrument and interpretation of the data. Instrument rotation includes: Gas Chromatograph - Mass Spectrometer, Raman Spectrometer, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer, Atomic Absorption and Ultraviolet-Visible Spectrometers*, and High Performance Liquid Chromatograph.* Instruments will be added as they are acquired. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CHEM 202 and CHEM 242 for *Instruments; Offered Most Semesters.

CHEM 301 — Physical Chemistry I (4 credits)
This course provides the theoretical basis for all of chemistry and related subjects, emphasizing thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics and reaction dynamics. Laboratory includes physical methods of measurement and computational techniques. Four hours of lecture-discussion and four hours of laboratory per week. CHEM 301 and 302 together are the physical chemistry foundation requirement for the ACS Chemistry major. CHEM 301 is the physical chemistry foundation requirement for the ACS Biochemistry major. Prerequisites: CHEM 242, MATH 152; Recommended: PHYS 222 and MATH 153; Offered Every Fall Semester.

CHEM 302 — Physical Chemistry II (4 credits)
This course is a follow-up to CHEM 301. It covers quantum chemistry, reaction dynamics, spectroscopy and statistical mechanics. The laboratory will be concerned with several experiments in physical chemistry with emphasis on various spectroscopic measurements and application of a variety of computational software for quantum calculations. Four hours of lecture-discussion and four hours of laboratory per week. CHEM 301 and 302 are the physical chemistry foundation requirement for the ACS Chemistry major. Prerequisites: CHEM 301, MATH 152; Recommended PHYS 222, MATH 153; Offered Every Spring Semester.

CHEM 311 — Advanced Analytical Chemistry (Area 2.1B) (4 credits)
This course focuses on instrumental methods of analysis. The lecture is devoted primarily to instrument design and the advantages and disadvantages of that design. Laboratory is emphasized and centers on method development projects. Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.  Prerequisite: CHEM 301; Offered Every Third Semester.

CHEM 330 — Medicinal Chemistry and Biochemistry (Area 2.1B) (4 credits)
The first part of this course will provide an in-depth analysis of the chemistry of biological macromolecules and the metabolic cycles. The remainder of this course is devoted to the underlying concepts of medicinal chemistry and the major classes of therapeutic drugs. Laboratory emphasizes synthesis and analysis of the classes of biological molecules, multi-step synthesis of pharmaceutical-type compounds, and an introduction to biological screening. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week.  Prerequisite: CHEM 202; Recommend BIOL 354; Offered Every Third Semester.

CHEM 331 — Advanced Organic Chemistry (Area 2.1B) (4 credits)
Advanced topics in organic chemistry, including spectroscopy, mechanisms and synthesis (including natural products) are covered. Emphasis varies. Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 202 and 301; Offered Some Interims.

CHEM 341 — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4 credits)
This course explores advanced topics in Inorganic Chemistry including atomic structure, covalent structures, group theory, molecular orbital theory, acid-base principles, solid-state chemistry, transition elements and coordination chemistry, bonding theories, spectroscopy, mechanisms, organometallic chemistry, catalysis, and bioinorganic chemistry. Laboratory exercises will focus on the synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds using instrumentation. Three hours of lecture, four hours of laboratory per week.   Prerequisites: CHEM 222; Recommended: CHEM 301, 302; Offered Every Third Semester.

CHEM 351 — The Chemistry of High Polymers (4 credits)
The structure and properties of macromolecules will be considered. Methods of synthesis and analysis of these polymers will be treated in some detail. Industrial processes for the preparation and manufacture of some important commercial polymers will be included.   Prerequisites: CHEM 202 and 301; Offered Infrequently.

CHEM 381 — Advanced Physical Chemistry (4 credits)
Advanced topics in physical chemistry with emphasis on advanced quantum chemistry, statistical thermodynamics, spectroscopy, quantum dynamics, matter-electromagnetic radiation interaction, nuclear dynamics beyond the Born-Oppenheimer regime and lasers. This course is typically problem oriented, and will use computer resources extensively, including some computer programming. Students may take this course with interests in chemistry, physics or mathematics.   Prerequisites: CHEM 301, PHYS 371 or MATH 220 and 310. Recommended: PHYS 222; Offered Some Interims.

CHEM 395 — Internship in Chemistry (1-4 credits)
Consult the department chair for a listing of available opportunities. Plans for an internship must be made well in advance of the term in which the internship is to be carried out. Prerequisite: Consent of the Instructor.

CHEM 197, 297, 397 — Topics in Chemistry (1-4 credits)

CHEM 199, 299, 399 — Independent Study (1-4 credits)
This course offers the opportunity to engage in experimental research with a faculty mentor. One credit hour will require four hours of laboratory work per week for the semester plus a comprehensive report, a departmental seminar, and if appropriate a presentation at a scientific meeting. This course designation is normally not used to replace a traditional course.   Prerequisites: Consent of the Instructor.