academics

Education

All-Grades Education Major
Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Major
Elementary Education Major
Secondary Education Major
Special Education Major

Education Endorsements
Education Minors

Education Courses
Special Education Courses
Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Courses

Professors: Sherry Feinstein (chair), S. VanBockern
Associate Professors: S. Andrews, M. Hallenbeck, M. Soukup
Assistant Professors: J. Ashworth, A. Durr, M. Dyce, C. Gunderson, P. Hanavan, M. Johnson, L. Laurich, K. Mahan, C. Steen
Administrator/Instructor: B. Fiala, Field Placement Officer
Certification Officer: 
M. Soukup

The Teacher Education Program at Augustana offers professional preparation programs for careers in the areas of Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Elementary Education, Secondary Education, All-Grades Education, Special Education, Sign Language Interpreting, and pre-professional preparation in Communication Disorders. The Teacher Education Program at Augustana College has been accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) since 1956. All programs leading to initial level certification are approved by the South Dakota Department of Education (SD DOE). It should be noted that periodic changes in the Teacher Education Program occur as state and national accrediting bodies revise their standards.

The conceptual framework for the Teacher Education Program is grounded in a philosophy that integrates the best of Western educational thought, the wisdom of indigenous Native American culture, and emerging research on positive youth development. Known as the Circle of Courage, this conceptual framework empowers teacher candidates with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to create positive learning environments so that all students can learn. The central premise of the Circle of Courage is that a set of shared values supports a community of learners. Those shared values are belonging, mastery, independence, and generosity. A set of professional competencies, based upon the Interstate New Teachers Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) principles, have been identified to guide course content and field experiences, as well as articulate what teacher candidates should know and be able to do upon program completion. The competencies assist teacher candidates in developing a commitment to and a proficiency in their chosen profession. The curriculum and field experiences of the Teacher Education Program are structured to blend the Circle of Courage values into a model for professional behavior. Throughout their program of study, teacher candidates complete course requirements and participate in field experiences designed to facilitate mastery and understanding of the program competencies.

Detailed information regarding the Teacher Education Program can be found online and in various program materials such as the Teacher Education Handbook and the Student Teaching Handbook.

Elementary Education Major:

Required Courses: 30 credit hours plus Student Teaching
EDUC 110 — Foundations of American Education (3 cr)
EDUC 219 — Technology in Education (3 cr)
EDUC 245 — Educational Psychology and Measurement (3 cr)
EDUC 275 — Teaching, Learning, and Connecting in Today’s Classrooms (3 cr)
EDUC 290 — Theory of Reading in the Elementary School (2 cr)
EDUC 301 — Methods of Teaching Elem and Midd Sch Science (2 cr)
EDUC 320 — Children’s Literature and Language Arts (3 cr)
EDUC 325 — Teaching of Reading in the Elem & Midd School (3 cr)
EDUC 350 — Teaching of Social Studies in Elem & Midd School (2 cr)
EDUC 355 — Human Relations in Education (3 cr)
EDUC 472 — Student Teaching: Elementary (TBD)
SPED 240 — Teaching in Inclusive Schools (3 cr)

Required Supportive Courses: 48-49 credit hours
ART 290 — Art and Children (3 cr)
BIOL 110 — Biology and Human Concerns (4 cr)
CHEM/PHYS 115 — Physical Science (4 cr)
–or– CHEM 120 — Intro to Chemistry
COMM 110 — Introduction to Communication (3 cr)
ENGL 110 — First-Year Composition (4 cr)
ENGL 200 — The Literary Experience: A Genre Approach (Recommended) (3 cr)
GEOG 220 — Geography & Earth/Space Science (3 cr)
GOVT 110 — Introduction to Government (3 cr)
HIST 110 — Introduction to Western Civilization I (3 cr)
HIST 120 — The American Experience to 1877 (3 cr)
–or– HIST 121 — The American Experience since 1877
MATH 113 — Methods of Teaching Elementary & Midd Sch Mathematics (3 cr)
MATH 140 — Quantitative Reasoning (3 cr)
MATH — Additional Math Content course 3-(4 cr)
MUSI 230 — Music, Theatre & Dance in the Elementary Classroom (2 cr)
NAST 320 — Native American Social Systems (3 cr)
-or- NAST 352 — History of the Lakota/Dakota
PE 265 — Health, PE and Movement in the Elem & Midd School (1 cr)

Secondary (Grades 7-12) and All-Grades (Grades K-12) Education Major:

Teaching majors at the 7-12/Secondary Level include: Biology, Chemistry, Communication, English, Government, History, Mathematics, and Physics. Students should declare Secondary Education (SEED) as a second major.

Teaching majors at the K-12/All-Grades level include: Art, French, German, Music Education, Physical Education, and Spanish; students should declare All-Grades Education (EK12) as a second major. In addition to completing the requirements for the first major, teacher candidates at the secondary and all-grade levels must complete the following courses.

Required Courses: (33-36 credit hours plus student teaching)
EDUC 110 — Foundations of American Education (3 cr)
EDUC 219 — Technology in Education (3 cr)
EDUC 245 — Educational Psychology and Measurement (3 cr)
EDUC 275 — Teaching, Learning, and Connecting in Today’s Classrooms (3 cr)
EDUC 310 — Secondary School Methods (3 cr)
— 310 D English (Offered spring semester)
— 310 E Foreign Language (Offered fall semester, even years)
— 310 F Mathematics (Offered fall semester, odd years)
— 310 G Physical Education (Offered fall semester, even years)
— 310 H Science (Offered spring semesters)
— 310 I Social Science (Offered fall semesters)
— 310 J Communication (Offered as Independent Scholarship)
— 310 K Art (Offered as Independent Scholarship)
MUSI 310 — Music Methods – Instrumental (Offered fall semesters)
MUSI 311 — Music Methods – Vocal (Offered fall semesters)
EDUC 330 — Foundations and Methods at the Middle Level (3 cr) (SEED major only)
EDUC 335 — Literacy in the Content Area (3 cr)
EDUC 345 — Adolescent Development (3 cr)
EDUC 355 — Human Relations in Education (3 cr)
EDUC 470/474 — Student Teaching: All-Grades/Secondary (TBD)
SPED 240 — Teaching in Inclusive Schools (3 cr)
COMM 110 — Introduction to Communication (3 cr)
NAST 320 — Native American Social Systems (3 cr)
–or– NAST 352 — History of the Lakota/Dakota

Special Education Major: 22 credit hours plus Student Teaching

Students seeking certification must major in either ELED or SEED/EK12 (including a content area) in addition to the SPED major. Typically it takes students four to four and a half years to complete this dual certification program.

Required Courses:
EDUC 110 — Foundations of American Education (3 cr)
SPED 120 — Introduction to Special Education (3 cr)
SPED 230 — Intro to Developmental and Cognitive Impairments (3 cr)
SPED 250 — Intro to Troubled Children and Youth (3 cr)
SPED 260 — Intro to Learning and Language Disabilities (3 cr)
SPED 280 — Practicum-Children and Youth with Disabilities (3 cr)
SPED 301 — Curriculum and Instruction for Child w/Disabilities (3 cr)
SPED 310 — Assessment of Children and Youth with Disabilities (3 cr)
SPED 320 — Consultation, Collaboration and Communication (3 cr)

One of the following courses: (3 cr)
SPED 330 — Educ Children and Youth with Cognitive Impairments
SPED 350 — Reclaiming Troubled Children and Youth
SPED 360 — Educ Children and Youth w/ Learning and Lang Disabilities

One of the following Student Teaching Courses: (TBD)
SPED 480 — Special Education: Emotional/Behavior Problems
SPED 481 — Special Education: Cognitive Impairments
SPED 486 — Special Education: Learning Disabilities

Educateur-Youth Worker Track: 32 credit hours
A Special Education major with an Educateur-Youth Worker concentration is designed for students preparing for work with youth with disabilities or at risk in residential child care settings, therapeutic camps, recreational programs, and community youth agencies and does not lead to certification.
Special Education Major requirements, plus:
SPED 350 — Reclaiming Troubled Children and Youth (3 cr)
SPED 395 — Internship (3 cr)
EDUC 345 — Adolescent Development (3 cr)
Electives from ART, HLTH, NAST, PE, PSYC or SOCI 9-15 cr
To be selected in consultation with the department.

Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Major: 38 credit hours, plus Student Teaching

This major prepares students to work in a variety of settings with individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing. The program is accredited by the Council on Education of the Deaf (CED). Students are eligible for CED provisional certification upon successful completion of the requirements for 1) the major; and 2) certification.

Students must major in either ELED or SEED/EK12 (including a content area) in addition to the EDHH major. Students seeking the CED provisional certificate must meet entrance and exit requirements for teacher education. Upon completion of the program, students will be certified in education of the deaf and in their additional field of education. Typically it takes students four to four and a half years to complete this dual certification program.

Required Courses:
ASL 110 — American Sign Language I (3 cr)
ASL 111 — American Sign Language II (3 cr)
ASL 210 — American Sign Language III (3 cr)
ASL 211 — American Sign Language IV (3 cr)
EDHH 220 — Foundations in American Deaf Culture (3 cr)
EDHH 221 — Introduction to Audiology (3 cr)
EDHH 224 — Introduction to Aural Rehabilitation (3 cr)
EDHH 287 — Practicum - Deaf and Hard of Hearing (3 cr)
EDHH 306 — Language Assessment & Instruction for Deaf & HH (3 cr)
SPED 315 — Classroom Behavior and Group Mgmt (2 cr)
EDHH 318 — Reading Assessment and Instruction for Deaf & HH (3 cr)
EDHH 329 — Working with Families, Professionals, & Deaf Plus St (3 cr)
EDHH 323 — Curriculum and Instruction for Deaf & HH (3 cr)
EDHH 487 — Student Teaching: Deaf Education Elementary (TBD)
EDHH 489 — Student Teaching: Deaf Education Middle School/High School (TBD)

Students also must pass the Intermediate level of the SLPI signing proficiency exam.

Education Endorsements and Minors:

Kindergarten Endorsement:
EDUC 231 — Kindergarten Education (3 cr)
EDUC 473 — Student Teaching: Kindergarten (TBD)

Middle School Endorsement:
Students wishing to add the Middle School Endorsement for SD licensure are required to complete coursework in education (EDUC 330; EDUC 345), coursework in the subject area of the endorsement (SEE BELOW), a methods course specific to the content area of endorsement and to student teach (EDUC 471) at the middle level.
— Language Arts requires 12 total credits, including 6 credits of composition/grammar and a minimum of 3 credits of reading
— Science requires 12 total credits, with at least one course in physical, one in earth/space and one in biological science
— Social Science requires 12 total credits, including one course in history, government, and geography
— Math requires 12 total credits of mathematics content coursework

K-12 ENL Endorsement: 18 credit hours
EDUC 355 — Human Relations in Education (3 cr)
At least one semester of a modern foreign language or NAST (3 cr)
EDUC 297 — Topics: Linguistics (fall only) (3 cr)
EDUC 360 — Foundations of ENL (fall only) (3 cr)
EDUC 370 — Literacy for ELL (interim only) (3 cr)
EDUC 380 — ENL Methods (spring only) (3 cr)

Requirements in addition to the above requirements if not previously completed:
EDUC 245 — Educational Psychology (3 cr)
Practicum, internship or student teaching inclusive of K-12 learners
EDUC 355 — Human Relations in Education ELL Practicum (3 cr)
EDUC 399 — Independent Study: ELL Practicum (3 cr)

Special Education Minor: 18 credit hours
SPED 120 — Introduction to Special Education (3 cr)
SPED 230 — Intro to Developmental & Cognitive Impairments (3 cr)
SPED 250 — Emotional & Behavioral Problems in Children & Youth (3 cr)
SPED 260 — Intro to Learning and Language Disabilities (3 cr)
SPED 280 — Practicum: Children and Youth with Disabilities (3 cr)
SPED — elective Chosen from SPED 306, 315, 320, 330, 350, 360; CMDS 201; EDHH 220, ASL 110 (3 cr)
EDHH and CMDS majors must select electives not already required in their respective majors.

Sign Language Studies Minor: 18 credit hours
ASL 110 — American Sign Language I (3 cr)
ASL 111 — American Sign Language II (3 cr)
ASL 210 — American Sign Language III (3 cr)
ASL 211 — American Sign Language IV (3 cr)
EDHH 220 — Foundations in Deafness (3 cr)
One elective chosen from the following courses: 3 cr
INTR 334 — American Sign Language V
INTR 360 — ASL Linguistics and Sociolinguistics
EDHH/INTR 397 — Special Topics Courses

English as a New Language (ENL) Minor: 21 credit hours
EDUC 355/555 — Human Relations in Education (field experience) (3 cr)
Modern Foreign Language (3 cr)
EDUC 360/560 — Foundations of ENL (3 cr)
EDUC 365/565 — Linguistics for ENL (3 cr)
EDUC 370/570 — Literacy for ELL (3 cr)
EDUC 380/580 — ENL Methods (3 cr)
EDCU 245 — Educational Psychology (3 cr)

Reading Minor: 24 credit hours
EDUC 290 — Theory of Reading (2 cr)
EDUC 320 — Children's Literature and Language Arts (3 cr)
EDCU 325 — Teaching of Reading in the Elementary and Middle School (3 cr)
EDUC 335 — Literacy in the Content Area (3 cr)
EDUC 370 — Literacy for ELL (3 cr)
EDCU 219 — Technology in Education (3 cr)
ENGL 110 — Freshman Composition (4 cr)
COMM 110 — Introduction to Communication (3 cr)

Education Courses:

EDUC 110 — Foundations of American Education (Area 3.3) (3 credits)
This introductory foundations course in education will examine the quest for equality of educational opportunity in today’s society. Students explore the foregoing in relationship to the historical and philosophical roots of education in today’s democratic society. This course, intended for pre-service teachers, will explore the knowledge, skills and dispositions that effective teachers have while providing a comprehensive, foundational background of the education field and teaching as a profession. Course includes an early field experience. Offered Every Semester, Including Interim.

EDUC 219 Technology in Education (3 credits)
This course will emphasize the interplay of three primary forms of knowledge: content, pedagogy, and technology. Technology-enhanced projects demonstrating learning activities that encourage all students to communicate, collaborate, create and think critically will serve as the primary focus for the course. The national technology standards in education will be underscored throughout the course. Learners extend their knowledge of learning theory to the application of educational technology, as they explore and implement ways to translate theory to practice. Offered Every Semester, Including Interim.

EDUC 231 — Kindergarten Education (3 credits)
Included in this course is a major study of curricula used in kindergartens. Techniques of instruction will be demonstrated and practiced. Materials appropriate for kindergarten children will be emphasized. Offered Interim, Odd Years.

EDUC 245 — Educational Psychology and Measurement (3 credits)
This course examines learning theories and their application to the classroom. It includes the study of human development in the cognitive, emotional, social, and moral domains, the transfer of learning, motivation theories, learning and teaching styles, and individual differences. Also, it provides an understanding of measurement and evaluation specifically focusing on descriptive statistical tools, standardized and teacher-made tests and grading practices. Recommended Corequisite: EDUC 275; Prerequisite Sophomore Standing; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 275 — Teaching, Learning, and Connecting in Today’s Classrooms (W– Area 2.1B) (3 credits)
This course is centered on best practice teaching methods and is required of all majors seeking teacher certification. The basic content of the course includes instruction in National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, lesson planning and delivery, multiple assessment strategies and creating exemplary classroom environments. Students will be assigned to a 35 hour practicum in an area school.  Recommended Corequisite: EDUC 245; Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 290 — Theory of Reading in the Elementary School (2 credits)
This course will compare and contrast past and present theories of learning to read and write. Current trends in comprehensive literature will be studied as well as the psychology of reading and reading development. Introduction to practical skills of comprehensive literature instruction and its assessment and the knowledge of language structure and its application are the focus of this course. Students will have the opportunity to observe and gain knowledge of the five essential reading principles of instruction for literacy: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension. Corequisites: EDUC 320 and 325; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 301 — Methods of Teaching Elementary and Middle School Science (2 credits)
This course is designed to give students practical experience in teaching biology at the elementary and middle school level. Students are expected to demonstrate various teaching methods, learn to use scientific equipment common to classrooms, provide feedback to peers, and reflect on their own professional development as science teachers. The course integrates biology content knowledge and teaching skills, and integrates hands-on learning from a constructivist perspective. A practicum experience is required. Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 310D — Secondary and Middle School Methods: ENGLISH (3 credits)
Principles of teaching, planning, curriculum, methods and media for secondary education are studied in this course. It is taught in sections with a common content area emphasis.   Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; Offered Fall Semesters, Odd Years.

EDUC 310E — Secondary and Middle School Methods: FOREIGN LANGUAGE (3 credits)
Principles of teaching, planning, curriculum, methods and media for secondary education are studied in this course. It is taught in sections with a common content area emphasis.   Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; Offered Fall Semesters, Odd Years.

EDUC 310F — Secondary and Middle School Methods: MATHEMATICS (3 credits)
Principles of teaching, planning, curriculum, methods and media for secondary education are studied in this course. It is taught in sections with a common content area emphasis.   Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; Offered Fall Semesters, Odd Years.

EDUC 310G — Secondary and Middle School Methods: PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3 credits)
Principles of teaching, planning, curriculum, methods and media for secondary education are studied in this course. It is taught in sections with a common content area emphasis.   Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; Offered Fall Semesters, Odd Years.

EDUC 310H — Secondary and Middle School Methods: SCIENCE (3 credits)
Principles of teaching, planning, curriculum, methods and media for secondary education are studied in this course. It is taught in sections with a common content area emphasis.   Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; Offered Fall Semesters, Odd Years.

EDUC 310I — Secondary and Middle School Methods: SOCIAL SCIENCE (3 credits)
Principles of teaching, planning, curriculum, methods and media for secondary education are studied in this course. It is taught in sections with a common content area emphasis.   Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; Offered Fall Semesters, Odd Years.

EDUC 310J — Secondary and Middle School Methods: COMMUNICATION (3 credits)
Principles of teaching, planning, curriculum, methods and media for secondary education are studied in this course. It is taught in sections with a common content area emphasis.   Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; Offered Fall Semesters, Odd Years.

EDUC 310K — Secondary and Middle School Methods: ART (3 credits)
Principles of teaching, planning, curriculum, methods and media for secondary education are studied in this course. It is taught in sections with a common content area emphasis.   Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; Offered Fall Semesters, Odd Years.

EDUC 320 — Children’s Literature and Language Arts (3 credits)
Students will develop an understanding of the components of language arts in the elementary and middle school curriculum, including oral and written communication. The study and evaluation of traditional and modern literature will be included. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; Corequisites: EDUC 290 and 325; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 325 — Teaching of Reading in the Elementary and Middle School (3 credits)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the philosophy, objectives, basic methods, techniques, and materials used in teaching reading. Comprehensive literacy and applications and assessment are also included.
Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; Corequisites: EDUC 290 and 320; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 330 — Foundations and Methods at the Middle Level (3 credits)
This course addresses the philosophy and pedagogy of middle school instruction and student learning in the 21st century. Students will compare and contrast the middle school model with junior high schools, analyze the developmental characteristics of young adolescents and the learning environments in which adolescents learn best, and develop appropriate curriculum, instruction, and assessments for young adolescent learners. Course includes a field experience providing students with an opportunity to practice and reflect on their views of instruction and student learning at the middle level. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 335 — Literacy in the Content Area (3 credits)
A course designed to acquaint the student with the basic theories and methods of effective instruction in the content areas at the middle and secondary level. Emphasis is placed on practical application of content area instructional literacy strategies to individual content areas. Current trends and issues are discussed.  Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 345 — Adolescent Development (Area 1.2) (3 credits)
Adolescence is a crucial transition period from childhood to adulthood. This course will examine adolescent development and issues within the context of the physical, cognitive, affective, and social domains. Focus will be on the adolescent’s self development with particular reference to relationships in the family, school, peer groups, and community. An eight hour diversity experience is required in this course. Only students seeking certification for middle school and secondary education may apply towards Area 1.2.  Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education; Non-Majors may Register with Instructor’s Permission; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 350 — Teaching of Social Studies in the Elementary and Middle School (2 credits)
Students will learn the scope and sequence of social studies in elementary and middle schools. Evaluation, national/state standards, procedures, materials and media are stressed with attention given to recent trends. Management techniques and the teacher’s role are included.   Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 355 — Human Relations in Education (3 credits)
This course investigates the values, culture and characteristics associated with persons of diversity. Dehumanizing biases including sexism, racism, ageism, perception of exceptionalities, religious bigotry, and other oppressive systems of attitude and behavior will be examined with particular reference to education in a pluralistic democratic society. The goal is to develop multi-cultural competence in educators. Prerequisite: Sophomore or higher standing. Offered Every Semester, Including Interim.

EDUC 360 — Foundations of English as a New Language (3 credits) 
This course will provide a foundational background and knowledge base to the historical, legal, and theoretical frameworks of education for English Language Learners (ELLs). The course will focus on acculturation issues for ELLs since a strong background in this forms the foundation for understanding how ELLs learn, how language acquisition works, and how to respond to behaviors in the classroom that are a result of acculturation issues. Offered Every Fall Semester.

EDUC 365 — ENL Linguistics (3 credits)
The study of linguistics will provide ENL teachers as well as other teachers with the basics of how languages work to interact with diverse students in a classroom setting. This course aims to offer an overview of linguistics as well as a reflection on the implications in the classroom while developing familiarity with linguistic terms and concepts. The goal is to provide an understanding of how language works and to study the components of linguistics including phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Students then use this knowledge of the English language and relate it to other languages. The study of social and linguistic structures is imperative for teachers in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages. Offered Every Fall Semester.

EDUC 370 — Literacy for English Language Learners (3 credits)
This course will review the systematic instruction used to teach reading and writing in one's first language and then explore the challenges and research-based adaptations needed to teach a student who must acquire the sounds and meanings of a second language along with initial reading and writing instruction. The course will focus on theories of language acquisition as they apply to how ELLs learn to read and write, while learning to listen to speak English. The course will consider how assessment is used to inform instruction including a review of appropriate assessment tools and their application to ELLs. Offered Every Interim.

EDUC 380 English as a New Language Methods (3 credits)
This course will explore ways to teach and integrate the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking in K-12 content-area classrooms for English Language Learners (ELLs). Students will consider a variety of best practice pedagogical and instructional approaches, strategies and assessment techniques. Course will include specific attention to the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol or SIOP. Class discussion will also focus on how to create and sustain a positive learning environment for ELLs. Offered Every Spring Semester.

EDUC 470 — Student Teaching: All-Grades (credits TBD)
Provides the opportunity for the student in art, modern world languages (French, German or Spanish), music and physical education to engage in observation and actual teaching in a K-12 setting under the direction and supervision of qualified classroom teachers. Grading System: S/U only.  Prerequisite: Completion of all Coursework Required for Major and Certification; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 471 — Student Teaching: Middle School (credits TBD)
Provides the opportunity for the student teacher to engage in observation and actual classroom teaching under the direction and supervision of qualified teachers. Grading System: S/U only.  Prerequisite: Completion of all Coursework Required for Major and Certification; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 472 — Student Teaching: Elementary (credits TBD)
Provides the opportunity for the student teacher to engage in observation and actual classroom teaching under the direction and supervision of qualified classroom teachers. Grading System: S/U only.  Prerequisite: Completion of all Coursework Required for Major and Certification; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 473 — Student Teaching: Kindergarten (credits TBD)
Provides the opportunity for the student teacher to engage in observation and actual classroom teaching under the direction and supervision of qualified classroom teachers. Grading System: S/U only.  Prerequisite: Completion of all Coursework Required for Major and Certification; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 474 — Student Teaching: Secondary (credits TBD)
Provides the opportunity for the student teacher to engage in observation and actual classroom teaching under the direction and supervision of qualified classroom teachers. Grading System: S/U only.  Prerequisite: Completion of all Coursework Required for Major and Certification; Offered Every Semester.

EDUC 197, 297, 397 — Topics in Education (2-4 credits)

EDUC 199, 299, 399 — Independent Study (1-4 credits)

EDUC 470-474 *  Student teaching is considered a full-time experience. The minimum length of time any student will spend student teaching is 12 weeks. Students should register for 1 credit hour for each week of student teaching, thus, the minimum number of credit hours any student will register for student teaching is 12 credit hours. Students, however, may complete more than 12 weeks of student teaching and register for more than 12 credit hours if they are pursuing teaching endorsements or double majors. While most students will be able to complete their student teaching within the parameters of the regular semester, students pursuing double majors or those with multiple endorsements, will find that their student teaching will carry over into or start in the Interim term. The Field Placement Coordinator will determine the number of credit hours each student should register for and will confirm this upon receipt of the student teacher roster to ensure that the credit hours registered for are in accordance with Departmental and College policy. Any deviations will be brought to the attention of the Registrar’s Office and will be corrected. 

Special Education Courses:

SPED 120 — Introduction to Special Education (3 credits)
This course provides a survey of current knowledge on individuals with disabilities. Content includes historical factors, legislation, characteristics, educational strategies, existing and emerging technologies, assessment, and support services for individuals with disabilities ranging from mild to severe. Students examine various areas of exceptionality, including learners who have cognitive impairments, behavioral disorders, visual impairments, hearing impairments, language disorders, autism, physical impairments and other health impairments. Offered Every Semester.

SPED 230 — Introduction to Developmental and Cognitive Impairments (3 credits)
This course introduces the field of Cognitive Impairments and how the disability impacts physical, educational, psychological, and spiritual development. Students will learn about related developmental disabilities including autism, fetal alcohol syndrome and cerebral palsy; medical aspects of disabilities; and the array of services needed across the life span to promote inclusion in schools and society. A 15 hour field experience is required. Offered Every Fall Semester.

SPED 240 — Teaching in Inclusive Schools (3 credits)
This course is required for all elementary, secondary and K-12 education majors who do not have a major or minor in SPED or EDHH. It provides information about the characteristics of students with disabilities, special and general education service delivery models and making adaptations that support inclusion of students with disabilities in education settings. A 15 hour field experience is required. Prerequisite: EDUC 275; Offered Every Semester.

SPED 250 — Introduction to Troubled Children and Youth (3 credits)
This course will discuss the social, behavioral, emotional and educational characteristics of children and adolescents who are experiencing conflict in home, school or community.  Offered Every Fall Semester.

SPED 260 — Introduction to Learning and Language Disabilities (3 credits)
Students will study the cognitive, linguistic, social and educational characteristics of children and adolescents with specific learning disabilities. Included is an orientation to research-based teaching strategies and an electronic practicum.  Offered Every Semester.

SPED 270 — Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders (3 credits)
This course will examine autism spectrum disorders and how individuals and families are affected by the disorder. The screening and evaluation process will be described. Students will understand the characteristics of autism spectrum disorders and how the sensory system can be impacted. Instructional strategies and assistive technology will be demonstrated and implementation techniques will be addressed. Approaches to develop and enhance social skills across the life span to ensure inclusion of individuals on the autism spectrum will be discussed. Offered Every Spring.

SPED 280 — Practicum: Children and Youth with Disabilities (3 credits)
This field experience requires 75 hours of observation and direct participation in a school or agency setting that serves children, adolescents or adults with disabilities. Students are required to reflect upon and document their experiences through journals, case studies and artifacts. The practicum is supervised and requires pre-registration clearance. Grading System: S/U only. Offered Every Interim.

SPED 301 — Curriculum and Instruction for Children with Disabilities (3 credits)
Included in this course is a major study of planning and implementing instruction for students with mild and moderate disabilities. Techniques of instruction will be demonstrated and appropriate materials will be examined within the context of organizing instruction in a special education setting. Emphasis will be given to Individual Educational Program (IEP) development and implementation. It is suggested that this course be taken after at least one special education methodology course. Offered Every Spring Semester.

SPED 306 — Secondary Programs in Special Education (2 credits)
This course addresses the unique needs of secondary school students across the spectrum of disabilities and the special educator’s role in helping students make transition to independent adult living. Major course topics will include career/vocational assessment and curriculum, instructional models and best practices in transition planning and the coordination of school, community, family, and agency planning resources in developing IEP transition plans. Offered Every Fall Semester.

SPED 310 — Assessment of Children and Youth with Disabilities (3 credits)
This course acquaints the special educator with the instruments and procedures used when identifying and evaluating students with disabilities. Topics will include basic test and measurement concepts; evaluating, selecting, administering, scoring and interpreting appropriate assessment instruments; and understanding legal and ethical standards of assessment. Students will participate in approximately four testing labs across the semester, for a total of 8-10 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; Offered Every Fall Semester.

SPED 315 — Classroom Behavior and Group Management (2 credits)
This course is a survey of the state of current knowledge about the creation and management of classroom environments to optimize achievement, responsibility and pro-social behavior. Included will be a study of the classroom as an interpersonal environment and available strategies for addressing individual and group behavior problems. Offered Every Spring Semester.

SPED 320 — Consultation, Collaboration and Communication (3 credits)
This course focuses on the teacher’s role as a consultant/collaborator who provides both direct and indirect service to students with disabilities. Major course topics will include consultation models, teaming, co-teaching, supervising paraprofessionals, conducting program evaluation, and working with a variety of professionals. Offered Every Spring Semester.

SPED 330 — Educating Children and Youth with Cognitive Impairments (3 credits)
This course will emphasize the instructional methods and techniques for managing challenging behaviors, specialized assessment tools and procedures, and collaboration used when teaching students with cognitive impairments in self-contained and inclusive settings. Major course topics will include autism, functional curriculum, assistive technology and development of IEP’s for students with cognitive impairments. Offered Fall Semester, Odd Years.

SPED 350 — Reclaiming Troubled Children and Youth (3 credits)
Principles and procedures for educating and treating children and adolescents with social, emotional, and behavioral problems. A comprehensive psycho educational approach to behavior management, crisis intervention and creating relationships that foster the development of competent, caring individuals. Offered Every Spring Semester.

SPED 360 — Educating Children and Youth with Learning and Language Disabilities (3 credits)
Emphasis will be given to diagnosis, intervention strategies, methods and management within educational programs for serving children and adolescents identified as having learning disabilities. Review of current research, literature and practices will be pursued to provide a perspective of the field for classroom teachers and special education personnel. Significant practice with research-based teaching strategies. Includes practicum. Offered Every Fall Semester.

SPED 480-486 — Student Teaching: Special Education (TBD)
Students seeking K-12 special education teacher certification will participate in advanced field experiences in their areas of specialization while under the supervision of qualified teachers. Students must meet all of the requirements set forth in the Teacher Education Handbook. Grading System: S/U only.

SPED 480 — Student Teaching: Special Education (TBD)
Emotional/Behavior Problems.  Offered Every Semester.

SPED 481 — Student Teaching: Special Education (TBD)
Cognitive Impairments.  Offered Every Semester.

SPED 486 — Student Teaching: Special Education (TBD)
Learning Disabilities.  Offered Every Semester.

SPED 395, 495 — Internship (3-6 credits)

SPED 199, 299, 399 — Independent Study (1-4 credits)
Special topics in all aspects of special education. Individual work in an on-campus or an off-campus project. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chair.

Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Courses:

ASL 110 — American Sign Language I (Area 3.4) (3 credits)
This course will emphasize the student’s development of receptive and expressive skills in ASL. In addition, the student will also learn functional vocabulary and how to utilize conversational techniques in ASL. The student will develop skills to recognize and express spatial relationships, use appropriate facial expressions and body movements, to visualize objects and use classifiers. Communication functions, vocabulary, grammar and cultural aspects of the Deaf community will be introduced and studied throughout the course. Offered Every Fall and Interim Semester.

ASL 111 — American Sign Language II (Area 3.4) (3 credits)
This course will emphasize the student’s further development of receptive and expressive skills in ASL. The student will also expand their sign vocabulary base and become more familiar with conversational techniques in ASL. The student will develop skills to recognize and express spatial relationships, use appropriate facial expressions and body movements, to visualize objects and use classifiers. Communication functions, vocabulary, grammar and cultural aspects of the Deaf community will be discussed and studied throughout the course. Prerequisite: ASL 110; Offered Every Spring Semester.

EDHH 201 — Language Development (3 credits)
The course will include in-depth coverage of language acquisition from birth through adolescence. Special emphasis on milestones, cultural, physical, and social influences, as well as the learning process from a cognitive viewpoint for ages 1-6.  Offered Every Fall Semester.

ASL 210 — American Sign Language III (3 credits)
This course will cover common communication situations such as describing and identifying objects, exchanging personal information about life events, and giving specific locations. The course will also discuss the proper ways to describe and identify things using classifiers and non-manual markers. Communication functions, vocabulary, grammar and cultural aspects of the Deaf community will be covered throughout the course. Prerequisite: ASL 111; Offered Every Fall Semester.

ASL 211 — American Sign Language IV (3 credits)
This course will focus on classifiers and spatial relationships, working on identifying and describing things and giving directions. The course helps students to enhance ability to talk about events using appropriate time and space relationships. Goals include improving facial expression, classifiers, and other vital storytelling/conversation components. Students will develop their expressive skills through a series of presentations (in-class and on-video) on various topics encompassing skills covered. Prerequisite: ASL 210; Offered Every Spring

EDHH 220 — Foundations in American Deaf Culture (3 credits)
This course provides insight into the culture of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and provides an understanding of the historical and philosophical trends in the Deaf Community with an overview of the psychological, emotional, vocational and educational status of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Included will be an introduction to the schools, organizations, and professional personnel involved in the education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing at the local, state and national levels. Offered Every Fall Semester.

EDHH 221 — Introduction to Audiology (3 credits)
This course provides a general study of the science of hearing assessment. Instruction emphasizes: terminology, physics of sound, anatomy and physiology of the hearing mechanism, audiologic evaluation and screening, and interpretation. Practical experience in hearing assessment is required. Cross-Listed with CMDS 221; Prerequisite; CMDS 170 OR EDHH 220; Offered Every Fall Semester.

EDHH 224 — Introduction to Aural Rehabilitation (3 credits)
Students will study the principles and practices of aural (re)habilitation including speech, reading, auditory training, communication training, amplification, hearing assistive technologies, and cochlear implants for persons that are deaf and hard of hearing. Practical field experience is required. Cross-Listed with CMDS 224; Recommended Prerequisite EDHH 221; Offered Every Spring Semester.

EDHH 232 — An Exploration of Organizations & Institutions Serving Deaf Individuals (1 credit)
Washington DC is a hub of Deaf culture; the home to many facilities and agencies that focus on Deaf services and education. Deaf people from all over the country move to Washington DC to work, learn, and live where there is a plethora of opportunity. We will travel to Washington DC to visit Gallaudet University, the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School, the Model Secondary School for the Deaf, the National Association of the Deaf headquarters, and the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf headquarters, as well as many national monuments and museums. At each location, we will explore the history and development of the organization. This course focuses on the study of the field of interpreting for and educating Deaf individuals, the history of the profession, and Deaf culture from an historical perspective. Students will have an opportunity to experience being a linguistic minority at Gallaudet University and navigate a large metropolitan area from the perspective of a Deaf individual. This course is geared towards Education of the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing majors as well as Sign Language Interpreting majors wishing to garner a better understanding of Deaf culture and the institutions serving those individuals. Prerequisites: EDHH 220 & 226. Corequisite: EDHH 227.

EDHH 287 — Practicum: Deaf and Hard of Hearing (3 credits)
This course requires observation and direct participation in experiences with children, adolescents, or adults who are deaf and hard of hearing. This practicum is recommended for sophomores. It is completed in programs for the deaf and hard of hearing and requires supervision and pre-registration clearance. Students will meet with the instructor prior to practicum to receive information regarding course requirements. Prerequisite: EDHH 227;  Offered Every Interim.

EDHH 306 — Language Assessment and Instruction for The Deaf and Hard of Hearing (3 credits)
This course will introduce the student to methods of evaluating the language of deaf and hard of hearing students of all ages. Class participants will study various approaches, including the Bi-Lingual/Bi-Cultural approach to help deaf and hard of hearing children of all ages with the acquisition of expressive language skills in the areas of pragmatics, semantics and syntax.  Offered Fall Semester, Odd Years.

EDHH 318 — Reading Assessment and Instruction for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (3 credits)
This course will introduce students to methods of evaluating the reading skills of deaf and hard of hearing students of all ages. Class participants will also study instructional strategies and review materials used for teaching reading to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in preschool through high school grades. Offered Spring Semester, Even Years.

EDHH 323 — Curriculum and Instruction for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (3 credits)
Students will study the teaching of mathematics, social studies, and science to children who are deaf or hard of hearing, and organizing and modifying the curricula for student in preschool through high school grades. Included is a focus on IEP and transitional planning and career and vocational education.  Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education; Offered Fall Semester, Even Years.

EDHH 329 — Working with Families, Professionals and Deaf-Plus Students (3 credits)
Students will study methods for providing services to Deaf and Hard of Hearing students of all ages and their families using itinerant teaching and consultation models. Students will also acquire knowledge about various disabilities other than deafness and develop skills in adapting curriculum and lessons for Deaf and Hard of Hearing students who have additional disabilities (Deaf Plus students) and students from culturally diverse backgrounds. Offered Spring Semester, Odd Years.

EDHH 487 — Student Teaching: Deaf Education Elementary (credits TBD)
This experience is required for students completing the major in EDHH. It includes practical experience in the classroom and other settings with children who are deaf and hard of hearing representing the specialization of the student under the direction and supervision of qualified classroom teachers. Grading System: S/U only.  Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education; Senior Standing; Offered Every Semester.

EDHH 489 — Student Teaching: Deaf Education Middle School/High School (credits TBD)
This experience is required for students completing the major in EDHH. It includes practical experience in the classroom and other settings with children who are deaf and hard of hearing representing the specialization of the student under the direction and supervision of qualified classroom teachers. Grading System: S/U only.  Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education; Senior Standing; Offered Every Semester.

EDHH 197, 297, 397 — Topics in Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (2-4 credits)

EDHH 199, 299, 399 — Independent Study (1-4 credits)
Special topics in all aspects of the education of deaf and hard of hearing individuals. Individuals work in an on-campus or an off-campus project. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Chair.