English

Professors: D. Hanson, S. Looney, J. Miller
Associate Professors: J. Blank-Libra, M. Harris, P. Hicks, D. Rives
Assistant Professor: D. Gerling,

Instructors: C. Jackson Nelson, J. Gohl, B. Boyens, D. Gale, L Carlson, M. McGoey

The English major combines breadth of curriculum with the in-depth study possible in a program emphasizing seminars and writing workshops. Students may choose a literary or a writing emphasis, depending on their future career goals and interests. Philosophically committed to helping students explore a wide diversity of writers and writing practices, the program exposes its majors to traditional masters of British and American literature along with the emerging voices of women and people of color, as well as literatures from India, Ireland, Japan, and Russia.

English Major:

40 credit hours
The recommended schedule for the first two years is the same for both emphases within the major, though students may adjust their plan to meet their personal interests, course availability, or other individual factors.
Students who are exempt from ENGL 110 on the basis of ACT/SAT scores must still meet the 39 credit-hour requirement.
Required Core Courses: 19 credit hours plus an emphasis area
ENGL 110 — First-Year Composition (4 cr)(or test-out)
ENGL 200 — The Literary Experience (3 cr)
ENGL 225 — World Literature I (3 cr)
–or– ENGL 226 — World Literature II
ENGL 230 — Introduction to British Literary History (3 cr)
ENGL 240 — Introduction to American Literary History (3 cr)
ENGL 361 — Shakespeare (3 cr)

Complete the coursework for one of the following emphasis areas:
Literature Emphasis: 21 credit hours
ENGL 300 — Seminar in Earlier British Literature (3 cr)
ENGL 310 — Seminar in Later British Literature (3 cr)
ENGL 320 — Seminar in Earlier American Literature (3 cr)
ENGL 330 — Seminar in Later American Literature (3 cr)
ENGL 340 — Seminar in Non-Western Literature (3 cr)
One of the following advanced language courses:
ENGL 269 — English Grammars (3 cr) *
ENGL 279 — History of the English Language (3 cr)
ENGL 289 — Seminar in Literary Criticism and Theory (3 cr)
One of the following advanced composition courses:
ENGL 304 — Creative Writing: Fiction (3 cr)
ENGL 305 — Creative Writing: Poetry (3 cr)
ENGL 306 — Creative Writing: Drama (3 cr)
ENGL 311 — Advanced Composition (3 cr) *
ENGL 312 — Writing for Magazines (3 cr)
ENGL 315 — Newspaper Writing: Critical/Editorial (3 cr)

Writing Emphasis: 21 credit hours
Four of the following courses:
ENGL 115 — News Reporting and Writing (3 cr)
ENGL 215 — Newspaper Writing: Sports (3 cr)
ENGL 239 — Advanced Journalism (3 cr)
ENGL 304 — Creative Writing: Fiction (3 cr)
ENGL 305 — Creative Writing: Poetry (3 cr)
ENGL 306 — Creative Writing: Drama (3 cr)
ENGL 311 — Advanced Composition (3 cr) *
ENGL 312 — Writing for Magazines (3 cr)
ENGL 315 — Newspaper Writing: Critical/Editorial (3 cr)
Two of the following courses:
ENGL 300 — Seminar in Earlier British Literature (3 cr)
ENGL 310 — Seminar in Later British Literature (3 cr)
ENGL 320 — Seminar in Earlier American Literature (3 cr)
ENGL 330 — Seminar in Later American Literature (3 cr)
ENGL 340 — Seminar in Non-Western Literature (3 cr)
One of the following advanced language courses:
ENGL 269 — English Grammars (3 cr) *
ENGL 279 — History of the English Language (3 cr)
ENGL 289 — Seminar in Literary Criticism and Theory (3 cr)
*The creative writing emphasis requires participation in ENGL 095.

*Students pursuing Student Teaching must complete ENGL 269 and 311 as a part of their literature or writing track. Secondary Education major must also be declared.

English Minor: 18 credit hours
In consultation with their advisor, students are encouraged to design a minor suited to their particular goals and interests. The minor may emphasize the study of writing, creative writing, and/or the study of literature.
ENGL 230 — Intro to British Literary History (3 cr)
ENGL 240 — Intro to American Literary History (3 cr)
ENGL — Electives at the 200 or 300 level (12 cr)
 

English Courses:

English 110 or test-out is a prerequisite for all other courses in English.

ENGL 095 — Journalism Participation (1 credit)
Staff work or editing positions on student publications. Cross-Listed with JOUR 095; Offered Every Semester.

ENGL 110 — First-Year Composition (Area 2.1A) (4 credits)
An introduction to academic writing in college. Emphasis is placed on the composition process: A well-put thesis, clarity and orderliness, sound development, the ability to relate careful analytical reading to effective writing, and elimination of major grammatical errors. By the end of the course students should be able to express their ideas persuasively, clearly, and correctly. A grade of C- or higher is required to satisfy Area 2.1A. Offered Every Semester.

ENGL 115 — News Reporting and Writing (W – Area 2.1B) (3 credits)
Students will focus on the theory and practice of reporting and writing news and feature stories for print media. Additional emphasis will be placed on multi-media components, including but not limited to the production and/or use of videos, blogs, photo galleries, and various interactive on-line elements. Cross-Listed with ENGL 115; Prerequisite ENGL 110; Offered Every Semester.

ENGL 140 — Contemporary Film Aesthetics (3 credits)
This course develops an aesthetic and critical appreciation of film by examining artistic trends and critical theories in contemporary cinematography. The course focuses on visual imagery, sound, story, acting, and directing to develop a critical framework for appreciating the artistic aspects of film. Students are challenged to think about how filmmakers use these elements of the motion picture to create films of enduring worth in what is perhaps the most popular medium of fine art in the twenty-first century. Offered Occasional Interims.

ENGL 150 — American Cinema (Area 3.5B) (3 credits)
This course combines a study of fundamental filmmaking techniques with a historical survey of American film from 1920 to 2000. In addition to developing an aesthetic appreciation for the art of American cinema, the course will examine the economic, social, cultural, and historical contexts in which that art form has been shaped. Offered Occasional Interims.

ENGL 168 — Criminal Behavior in Society and Media (3 credits)
This course will examine crime-based television series and films, as well as crime fiction from the 19th century to the present. Works will be analyzed from historical, literary, and social perspectives. Study of the evolution of real-life crimes, the mindset of criminals, and the investigative techniques used in crime solving will provide students the opportunity to analyze the nature of crime as represented in the various media. The course will identify criminal behavior, the forces that perpetuate such behavior, and the effects of crime on criminals, victims, and society. Offered Occasional Interims.

ENGL 200 — The Literary Experience: A Genre Approach (3 credits) (W – Area 2.1B and Area 3.5A)
An introduction to major literary genres including fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. Course themes and readings vary by section. The writing component consists of three to five essays of analysis and an emphasis on the writing process. To be completed prior to the end of the sophomore year. Prerequisite: ENGL 110 (with a grade of C- or higher); Offered Every Semester.

ENGL 215 — Newspaper Writing: Sports (W – Area 2.1B) (3 credits)
Conducted as a workshop, this course considers the theory and practice of sports writing for print media. Students will learn how to write a variety of sports stories while studying and critiquing sports writing at a local and national level. Cross-Listed with JOUR 215; Offered Every Other Spring Semester.

ENGL 225 — World Literature I (Area 3.1A) (3 credits)
A survey of world literature from 2500 BC to 1650 AD, with special emphasis given to the Mediterranean region. Texts will include drama, fiction, and both narrative and lyric poetry. Offered Every Spring Semester and Some Interims.

ENGL 226 — World Literature II (Area 3.1B) (3 credits)
Reading and discussion from the 17th to the 21st century and expanding the scope further outside the European tradition. Offered Every Fall Semester.

ENGL 230 — Introduction to British Literary History (3 credits)
An introductory overview of British literature and authors. Emphasis is placed on issues of literary history. Students become familiar with the standard scheme of periodization and learn to think about literature in relation to the currents of history. In addition, they explore such subjects as literary influence, changes in literary technology and the consumption of the written word, changes in identity and colonialism, and changing theories about the nature and value of literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Every Fall Semester.

ENGL 239 — Advanced Journalism (W - Area 2.1B) (3 credits)
This course will consider public affairs through coverage of events such as school board and city council meetings. Additional emphasis will be placed on beat reporting, including in-depth coverage of issues emerging from areas such as government, science and health, the economy, religion, and the legal system. Emphasis will be given to creating and using multimedia components to deliver information. Students will advance their philosophy of freedom of the press through the study of various philosophical orientations. Cross-Listed with ENGL 239; Prerequisite JOUR 115; Offered Every Other Fall Semester.

ENGL 240 — Introduction to American Literary History (3 credits)
An overview of the literatures written in the region we now know as the United States from the time of European colonization until the present. Course readings will represent literary periods and movements from the Colonial and Revolutionary periods, to contemporary Postmodernism. Lectures and discussion will consider both the development of American literary traditions and the connections between literature and social phenomena such as first contacts between Native Americans and Europeans, slavery, industrialization, social reform, and the women’s movement. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Every Spring Semester.

ENGL 269 — English Grammars (3 credits)
An in-depth study of how English sentences are constructed and how that knowledge can aid in other endeavors such as writing or the study of literature. Structural grammar will be emphasized with comparison to traditional and transformational grammars. The history of the language, morphology and semantics are included. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Every Interim.

ENGL 279 History of the English Language (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the historical development of the English language from its origins in Anglo-Saxon to its current incarnations around the globe. Students will learn basic principles of linguistic description and analysis, including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. In addition, students will examine the role of key literary figures such as Chaucer and Shakespeare in establishing standard dialects and developing vocabulary and syntax. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Occasional Interims.

ENGL 289 Seminar in Literary Criticism and Theory (3 credits)
What happens when we read literature? How does a literary work come to "mean"? What do literary texts tell us about the nature of language? What do they tell us about the culture they're part of? Many literary critics and theorists have pondered these questions lately, and we'll explore them too, by studying primary texts in 20th- and 21st- century criticism and theory. The particular focus of the course will vary but will typically involve discussion of structuralism and post-structuralism, feminist criticism, and cultural studies. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Every Interim.

ENGL 300 — Seminar in Earlier British Literature (3 credits)
This seminar will consider special topics in British literature from the 6th to the 18th century. Each course will be organized by a theme, by a central critical question or questions, or by a genre, literary movement, period, or major figure. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Occasional Semesters.

ENGL 304 — Creative Writing: Fiction (W – Area 2.1B) (3 credits)
Conducted as a writers’ workshop, this course explores strategies for developing narrative voice as well as creating plot, setting, character, and dialogue. We explore different sub-genres, from the “short-short” story to the novel, and read both contemporary and classic writers to determine what constitutes excellence in fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Every Other Spring Semester .

ENGL 305 — Creative Writing: Poetry (W – Area 2.1B) (3 credits)
Conducted as a writers’ workshop, this course explores the art and craft of poetry writing in both traditional forms and free verse. While reading work by a variety of outstanding poets - mostly modern and contemporary - we work to develop our own poetic voices and at the same time strive for the highest standards of poetic writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Every Other Spring Semester.

ENGL 306 — Creative Writing: Drama – Writing for the Stage and Screen (W – Area 2.1B) (3 credits)
Conducted as a writer’s workshop, this course explores the specific skills and knowledge necessary to the working playwright, including the fundamentals of stagecraft. Basic elements of screenwriting will also be considered. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Every Other Fall Semester.

ENGL 310 — Seminar in Later British Literature (3 credits)
This seminar considers special topics in British and Irish literature from the late 18th century to the present. Study may include not only writers from the United Kingdom and Ireland but also colonial/postcolonial writers from the former British Empire.
Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Occasional Semesters.

ENGL 311 — Advanced Composition (W – Area 2.1B) (3 credits)
Students in this advanced writing course develop their abilities as writers of non-fiction prose. Emphasis is on developing voice and perfecting style whether for composing personal essays or for presenting research. Students can expect to participate in class writing workshops as well as experience a short review of grammar and mechanics. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Every Semester.

ENGL 312 — Writing for Magazines (W – Area 2.1B) (3 credits)
Conducted as a workshop, this course emphasizes a step-by-step approach to the business of freelance writing. Students will select topics and study potential markets in an effort to sell research articles and first-person essays. Students will read, analyze and study a wide range of articles and writers as they develop their writing style. Cross-Listed with JOUR 312; Offered Every Spring Semester.

ENGL 315 — Newspaper Writing: Critical/Editorial (W – Area 2.1B) (3 credits)
Conducted as a workshop, this course considers the theory and practice of writing reviews and opinion pieces. Students will review a variety of popular art forms, and will develop skills in writing editorial and opinion pieces. The study and critique of local and national reviewers and opinion writers will also be included. Cross-Listed with JOUR 315; Offered Every Other Fall Semester.

ENGL 320 — Seminar in Earlier American Literature (3 credits)
This seminar considers special topics in American literature from colonial settlement through the Civil War. Each course is organized by a theme, central critical questions, or by a genre, literary movement, period, or major figure. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Every Other Fall Semester.

ENGL 330 — Seminar in Later American Literature (3 credits)
This seminar considers special topics in American literature from the Civil War to the present. Each course is organized by a theme, by a central critical question or questions, or by a genre, literary movement, period, or major figure. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Occasional Semesters.

ENGL 340 — Seminar in Non-Western Literature (Area 3.6) (3 credits)
This seminar considers literature from outside the mainstream of American, English and Western European literary traditions. Each course offering will be organized by a theme, by a central critical question or questions, or by a genre, literary movement, period or major figure. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Occasional Semesters.

ENGL 361 — Shakespeare (W – Area 2.1B) (3 credits)
A critical study of the major plays of Shakespeare, their place in the development of English drama, and their current performances on stage and screen. Prerequisite: ENGL 200; Offered Every Spring Semester.

ENGL 370 — History of the English Language (3 credits)
This course introduces students to the historical development of the English language from its origins in Anglo-Saxon to its current incarnations around the globe. Students will learn basic principles of linguistic description and analysis, including phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. In addition, students will examine the role of key literary figures such as Chaucer and Shakespeare in establishing standard dialects and developing vocabulary and syntax. Offered Every Third Spring Semester.

ENGL 380 — Seminar in Literary Criticism and Theory (3 credits)
What happens when we read literature? How does a literary work come to “mean”? What do literary texts tell us about the nature of language? What do they tell us about the culture they’re part of? Many literary critics and theorists have pondered these questions lately, and we’ll explore them too, by studying primary texts in 20th- and 21st- century criticism and theory. The particular focus of the course will vary but will typically involve discussion of structuralism and post-structuralism, feminist criticism, and cultural studies. Offered Every Other Spring Semester.

ENGL 390 — Senior Honors Thesis: Research Component (0-3 credits)
This is the first semester of a year-long commitment to an academic or creative project designed by a student. Under the guidance of a professor in the English and Journalism department, students will spend one semester researching a topic of their choice and then, in a following semester, they will construct a formal paper (ENGL 391). Projects may be academic or creative in nature. Students will present their Senior Honors Thesis before a board of professors in an oral defense known as Viva Voce. Successful completion of a Senior Honors Thesis will allow the student to graduate with “Departmental Distinction in English”. Prerequisites: 3.0 CUM GPA; 3.5 GPA in Major; Admittance into Sigma Tau Delta (International English Honors Society); Permission of the Department Chair; This Component of the Senior Honors Thesis is Begun in Fall Semester. ENGL 390 and ENGL 391 Cannot be Taken Concurrently.

ENGL 391 — Senior Honors Thesis: Writing Component (0-3 credits)
This is the second semester of a year-long commitment to an academic or creative project designed by a student. Under the guidance of a professor in the English and Journalism department, students will spend one semester writing about a topic of their choice. Projects may be academic or creative in nature. Students will present their Senior Honors Thesis before a board of professors in an oral defense known as Viva Voce. Successful completion of a Senior Honors Thesis will allow the student to graduate with “Departmental Distinction in English.” Prerequisites: ENGL 390; 3.0 CUM GPA; 3.5 GPA in Major; Admittance into Sigma Tau Delta (International English Honors Society); Permission of the Chair of the Department; This component of the Senior Honors Thesis is Begun in Spring Semester. ENGL 390 and ENGL 391 Cannot be Taken Concurrently.

ENGL 395 — Internship (2-4 credits)
Work in a professional setting appropriate for English majors, in an area of interest to the student, involving part-time or full-time employment by a cooperating business, office, or agency. Arranged on an Individual Basis.

ENGL 197, 297, 397 — Topics in English (2-4 credits)

ENGL 199, 299, 399 — Independent Study (2-4 credits)