academics

Nursing

Professor: J. Philipp (chair)K. Younger
Assistant Professors: K. Fritz, M. Isaacson, P. Schroeder, L. White
Instructors: K. Abbott, J. Herrmann, B. Karel, M. Nelson, P. Waltman

The mission of the professional Nursing program is to prepare students to apply knowledge and Christian values in the understanding and fostering of health, wholeness, and human potential in a changing world. The curriculum is grounded in nursing science as well as the biological and social sciences and the humanities. The guiding values of the program are congruent with the mission of Augustana: teaching/learning from a liberal arts perspective, living in community, cultivating excellence, developing servant leadership and living faith in vocation. Graduates are prepared to address complex issues in health through experiences that facilitate both their personal and professional growth. The Nursing program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). Graduates are eligible to take the National Council of State Boards of Nursing Licensing Examination (NCLEX) for licensure as registered nurses. They are prepared for entry level positions anywhere in the health care system, and they have a strong foundation for graduate study.

Nursing Major:

78 credit hours
Required Courses: 48 credit hours
NURS 200 — Introduction to Professional Nursing (3 cr)
NURS 230 — Pharmacotherapeutics (3 cr)
NURS 324 — Health Pattern Recognition/Nutrition (3 cr)
NURS 326 — Nursing Therapeutics (4 cr)
NURS 328 — Pathophysiology (3 cr)
NURS 340 — Adult Health Nursing I (4 cr)
NURS 352 — Child Health Nursing (3 cr)
NURS 354 — Public Health Science (2 cr)
NURS 410 — Maternal and Reproductive Health Nursing (3 cr)
NURS 420 — Behavioral Health Nursing (3 cr)
NURS 425 — Behavioral Health Nursing Lab (2 cr)
NURS 430 — Community Health Nursing (3 cr)
NURS 435 — Community Health Nursing Lab (2 cr)
NURS 441 — Adult Health Nursing II (4 cr)
NURS 450 — Perspectives in Professional Nursing (3 cr)
NURS 451 — Leadership in Professional Nursing (3 cr)

Required Supportive Courses: 30 credit hours
BIOL 150 — Human Anatomy (4 cr)
BIOL 225 — Human Physiology (4 cr)
BIOL 250 — Introductory Microbiology (4 cr)
CHEM 120 — Introduction to Chemistry (4 cr)
CHEM 145 — Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry (4 cr)
MATH 140 — Quantitative Reasoning (or higher math course) (4 cr)
PSYC 125 — Life-Span Human Development (3 cr)
SOCI 110 — Contemporary Society (3 cr)

Related information: The major in Nursing has the following provisions and requirements: 1) a criminal background check conducted prior to a student’s enrollment in clinical nursing courses; 2) a minimum grade point average of 2.70 for the entire college program of study; 3) achievement of a grade of C- or higher in required support courses (A student is allowed to repeat a maximum of two required prerequisite courses one time.); and 4) evidence of personal qualifications essential for success in professional nursing.

Progression into subsequent nursing courses or to graduation is contingent upon attaining a "C" or better (minimum of 74%) in both the theory and clinical portions of all preceding nursing courses. Unsatisfactory completion of a nursing course requires that the student request readmission to the nursing major and permission to re-enroll in the failed course the next time the course is offered. Readmission is contingent on space availability, recommendations from the student's advisor and course professor of the failed course, and the professional judgment of the Nursing Admission/Progression Committee. A student is allowed to repeat a maximum of one nursing course one time.

Nursing majors enrolled in clinical nursing courses are provided with a current copy of the Department of Nursing Student Handbook, which delineates policies and procedures affecting students in the nursing program. Baccalaureate degree for Registered Nurses: For information contact the chair of the Nursing department.

Nursing Courses:
NURS 200 — Introduction to Professional Nursing (3 credits)
This course will provide an introduction to the profession and discipline of nursing, the relationship of nursing to liberal arts, and the nursing scope of practice in the United States health care system. Ethics, confidentiality, and communication skills will be emphasized as pillars of the art and science of professional nursing. Selected nursing theories and a framework for translating nursing research into practice will be introduced. Perspectives of practicing nurses in various roles will be highlighted. Students will be introduced to essential elements of the nurse-patient relationship and professional nursing through experiential, meaningful learning activities, including but not limited to, small group dialogue, group projects, and class discussion. This course is a prerequisite or corequisite for NURS 326. Offered Every Fall Semester.

NURS 230 — Pharmacotherapeutics (3 credits)
This course introduces the theoretical basis and application of nursing therapeutics with emphasis on pharmacology. Content areas include pharmacological concepts related to the major drug groups, drug actions, adverse reactions and nursing implications. Attention is given to life span considerations, cultural, legal, ethical, and safety implications. There will also be an emphasis on the role of the professional nurse as patient educator and advocate. Students will be introduced to essential elements of pharmacology through meaningful learning activities, including but not limited to, case studies, NCLEX questions, and discussions. This course is a prerequisite to NURS 326 or permission of instructor. Offered Every Spring Semester.

NURS 324 — Health Pattern Recognition/Nutrition (3 credits)
This course focuses on health assessment through the life span. Content areas include functional, physical, nutritional, wellness, health and risk assessment. Selected developmental assessment with emphasis on the older adult is included. Health patterns of individuals and groups are identified and examined in relation to definitions of health, cultural perspectives, national normative data, and quality of life issues. The nurse-person process includes health teaching of individuals, groups, and/or communities. Concepts of health pattern profiling are introduced and examined in relationship to health care delivery systems. Clinical experiences are scheduled in campus lab and community agencies. Corequisites: NURS 326 and 328; Offered Every Fall Semester.

NURS 326 — Nursing Therapeutics (4 credits)
This course focuses on the theoretical basis of the nurse-person process in understanding human health patterns and supporting changing health patterns. Opportunities for application of critical thinking, nursing process, communication, nursing therapeutics, as well as the development of beginning clinical reasoning and psychomotor skills are provided in campus and clinical laboratory experiences. Selected readings from nursing science are examined in relation to nursing therapeutics and quality of life issues. Models of health care delivery and nursing informatics are introduced. Pharmacology will be incorporated with an emphasis on pharmacological principles and the nursing process and professional behavior. Prerequisites: NURS 230; Prerequisite or Corequisite: NURS 200; Corequisites: NURS 324 and 328; Offered Every Fall Semester.

NURS 328 — Pathophysiology (3 credits)
This course focuses on the pathophysiologic basis of changing health patterns. Emphasis is placed on relating normal physiologic function to changes that occur in the expression of disease and contribute to altered health patterns in humans. Aspects of cellular, organ, and body system alterations are examined in relation to the pattern of the whole as humans experience changing patterns of health. Emphasis is also placed on relating the manifestations of disease, diagnostic tests and collaborative therapeutic interventions to underlying pathophysiologic processes. Corequisites: NURS 324 and 326; Offered Every Fall Semester.

NURS 340 — Adult Health Nursing I (4 credits)
The focus of this course is on understanding changing patterns of health experienced by adults with acute and chronic health conditions. Nursing practice in acute care settings is grounded in nursing science with emphasis on being, knowing and acting with compassion and caring in evolving relationships and fostering health, wholeness and human potential of adults, their families and communities from which they come. Opportunities are provided for students to integrate key processes and concepts to include knowledge of acute and chronic health conditions, pathophysiology, pharmacology, nursing process, the aging process, nursing care management across the health care continuum, interdisciplinary collaboration, ethical reasoning, levels of prevention, and teaching-learning theory. Prerequisites: NURS 324, 326 and 328; Offered Every Spring Semester.

NURS 352 — Child Health Nursing (3 credits)
The focus of this course is on the nurse-person process in the care of children and families across the health care continuum. Emphasis is on understanding health experiences of children with changing patterns of health. Developmental theory and quality of life issues from the child’s and family’s perspective are emphasized. Child and family health issues in relation to health care are examined in acute care and community settings. This includes five weeks of clinical (acute care) experience with children, as well as exposure to a variety of pediatric community settings; exploring their contribution to children’s health and well-being. Pharmacology is reinforced throughout the course with emphasis on the nursing process. Prerequisites: NURS 324, 326 and 328; Corequisite: NURS 340; Offered Every Spring Semester.

NURS 354 — Public Health Science (2 credits)
This course focuses on beginning knowledge of assessment, policy development, planning, and assurance of health for populations and communities. Skills and knowledge relevant to nursing science and public health are integrated to inform understanding of community health nursing. Epidemiology, population demographics, vital statistics, health care delivery models, advocacy resources, and levels of prevention are emphasized. The interconnectedness of health, culture, environment, economics, technology and societal values within diverse communities are explored from the local and global perspective. Preserving and assuring health for all challenges students to consider patterns of health as unique experiences of the community that must be honored and understood as well as translated into substantive information. Offered Every Spring Semester.

NURS 406 — Nursing and Health Care in the United States (2 credits)
This course serves as a vehicle for welcoming and orienting international nursing students to the culture in the Midwestern United States, the Sioux Falls community and the liberal arts community of Augustana College. Emphasis is upon an overview of the scope and standards of nursing practice in the US, comparison and contrast of the US health care system with international models of care delivery, medical terminology, and health, and cultural considerations for the American Indian population. Open to international students only. Graded: S/U

NURS 410 — Maternal and Reproductive Health Nursing (3 credits)
The focus of this course is on the nurse-person process in the care of the childbearing family across the health care continuum. Students will explore physiological, psychological, and developmental stressors experienced by childbearing families. Students will also evaluate social, cultural and societal issues that affect reproductive health care with women and men. Clinical experiences are in acute care and community settings. Prerequisites: NURS 200, 230, 324, 326, 328; Offered Every Spring Semester.

NURS 420 — Behavioral Health Nursing (3 credits)
The prime focus of this course is on the nurse-person process in the care of persons experiencing changing health patterns. Being with persons/groups/communities as they experience changes in health patterns provides the foundation for the student to examine concepts from nursing theory, mental health literature and crisis theory. Human behavior is studied across the life span with a special emphasis on understanding changing patterns of health from the person’s perspective. Special emphasis is placed on the students’ own understanding of self and personal patterns of health as these relate to professional nursing practice. The arts and humanities are incorporated to assist students to delineate what it means to be human, live authentically, and share with others while preserving the variety and uniqueness of the person. Clinical experiences are provided in the community, including acute care behavioral health settings. Prerequisites: NURS 200, 230, 324, 326, 328; Offered Every Semester.

NURS 430 — Community Health Nursing (3 credits)
The focus of this course is on the nurse-community process in care of families, groups, and communities. Community health nursing practice is guided by nursing science and informed by community health science, public health, environmental health and health promotion/disease prevention principles. Cultural diversity and socially relevant issues interconnected with health are explored in relation to quality of life from the community perspective. Clinical opportunities are provided in community settings. Prerequisites: NURS 200, 230, 324, 326, 328, 354; Corequisites: NURS 340, 352; Offered Every Semester.

NURS 441 — Adult Health Nursing II (4 credits)
This is the second semester of an eight credit hour sequence in adult health nursing. The course builds on the junior level adult health nursing course with increased complexity of nursing care situations and expectations for clinical judgment. The focus of this course is on understanding changing patterns of health experienced by adults and chronic health conditions. Students are challenged to think critically and develop skill in priority setting in complex care situations through interactive learning experiences in class, clinical and hands-on laboratory experiences including critical care and emergency care situations. Opportunities are provided for students to integrate key processes and concepts to include nursing care/case management across the health continuum, pathophysiology, pharmacology, nursing assessment, interdisciplinary collaboration, ethical reasoning, teaching-learning theory and evidence-based practice. Prerequisites: NURS 200, 230, 324, 326, 328, 340; Offered Every Fall Semester.

NURS 450 — Perspectives in Professional Nursing (Area 2.1B) (3 credits)
This course focuses on nursing research as it relates to evidence based or evidence informed practice. Opportunities are provided for students to gain increased understanding of the research process and research utilization (evidence-based practice) in practice. The relationship between nursing research and the development of nursing science is emphasized. Individually and in groups, students appraise research articles, write a significance paragraph (paper), interpret nationally benchmarked databases and their impact on quality care, and a paper synthesizing an evidence-based research practice relevant to specific topic. This course satisfies the writing (W) requirement in the curriculum. Prerequisite: NURS 200; Offered Every Fall Semester.

NURS 451 — Leadership in Professional Nursing (3 credits)
This course focuses on professional role development, nursing leadership, and contemporary issues in nursing. Students will gain increased understanding of the staff nurse’s role in leadership, with opportunities for practical experience in the areas of delegation, priority setting, critical thinking, decision making, quality improvement, evidence based nursing practice, information management and safety. Students will examine leadership and management theories. Students will explore legal, ethical and political issues in nursing. The clinical component includes an 80-hour clinical practicum with a nurse preceptor. The clinical experience provides an opportunity for students to integrate nursing theory, research, leadership, management, and ethics into their nursing practice. Students will participate in delegation, priority setting, decision making, evidence based nursing, information management and interdisciplinary experiences in an approved health care setting. Prerequisites: NURS 200, 230, 324, 326, 328, 340; Offered Every Interim.

NURS 468 — NCLEX Review (1 credit)
This course is designed to prepare the student for success on the NCLEX exam. By the end of the course, the student will strengthen their knowledge base of the nursing content, develop test-taking skills to reflect current knowledge, implement strategies to prevent and reduce test anxiety, and formulate a study plan for NCLEX success. Grading System: S/U Only.
Prerequisites: NURS 200, 230, 324, 326, 328, 340, 352; Corequisites: NURS 441, 451; Offered Every Spring Semester.

NURS 495 — Internship (1-2 credits)
This practicum experiences for senior level nursing majors may be taken or 1-2 credits (one credit is equal to 40 practicum hours). It provides an opportunity for students to integrate nursing theory and nursing research as well as the principles of nursing practice into an intensive, preceptored experience.

NURS 197, 297, 397, 497 — Topics in Nursing (2-4 credits)

NURS 299, 399, 499 — Independent Study (2-4 credits)