Augustana Hosts Holocaust Symposium, Exhibit

Event Details


Date: February 6, 2009

Times: The symposium, “After Auschwitz: The Memory, Meaning, and Representation of the Holocaust,” begins at 8:00 a.m. and concludes at 5:00 p.m.

Location: Humanities Center, Augustana College

Ticket Info: The program is free and open to the public.

SIOUX FALLS – The Eide-Dalrymple Gallery, in a joint exhibit with the Washington Pavilion, is hosting a show of Holocaust paintings by Fritz Hirschberger.

In addition, a symposium focusing on the Holocaust, will be held Saturday, February 7, at Augustana College. The program is free and open to the public.

The symposium, “After Auschwitz: The Memory, Meaning, and Representation of the Holocaust,” begins at 8:00 a.m. and concludes at 5:00 p.m. Scholars and artists from across the country will give presentations and lead discussions about issues related to the Holocaust. Questions to be addressed include:

How do we remember, teach and study that which is said to be beyond rational explanation?

How do artistic productions – visual, literary, theatrical, etc – shape understanding of the Holocaust?

How can the Holocaust be re/presented to a contemporary world where genocide is a continuing reality?

How have recent genocide and terrorist events shaped or leant urgency to Holocaust studies?

What are the implications and weight of bearing witness and the experiences of survivors in the face of producing secondary knowledge and collective memory?

The symposium culminates in joint gallery receptions and a keynote address by Dr. Daniel Magilow, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Dr. Magilow received a B.A. in Comparative Literature from Columbia University and his M.A. and Ph.D. in German from Princeton University. He taught briefly at the University of North Texas, and worked as the Pearl Resnick Postdoctoral Fellow at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

Aside from Holocaust Studies and German-Jewish Studies, His research interests focus on Weimar and Nazi Germany and the history of photography. He has several forthcoming articles about Holocaust photography and Holocaust memorials and is currently finishing a manuscript about photographically-illustrated books in interwar Germany.

Fritz Hirschberger (1912-2004) received his artistic training in Germany during the 1930s. As a Jew of Polish decent, he escaped Germany, only to be conscripted into the Polish army, sentenced to a Russian labor camp, then conscripted back into the military to fight in Palestine, North Africa, and later, Italy.

Most of his family died during the war. Only after decades of suppressing his Holocaust memories, Hirschberger began to confront ideas of history, memory, complicity, and what it means to be a survivor in two large series of paintings - The Fifth Horseman (to be shown at the Eide/Dalrymple Gallery through March 1) and Indifference – the Sur-Rational Paintings (to be shown at the Washington Pavilion Visual Arts Center through March 8).

A full schedule of the Holocaust Symposium is available online.


Lindsay Twa
Asst. Professor of Art History
Director of Eide-Dalrymple Art Gallery

Phone: 605.274.4010
lindsay.twa@augie.edu