news

94 Percent of 2010 Augustana Graduates Accept Employment

In spite of a still-challenged economy, 94 percent of 2010 Augustana graduates seeking employment have accepted a position related to their major or chosen field.

In addition, 68 percent of 2010 graduates accepting employment remained in South Dakota. Of the 162 graduates now working in South Dakota, 129 were originally residents of the state.

“Augustana has long been a net importer of intellectual capital to the state of South Dakota,” said Rob Oliver, president of the College. “These numbers illustrate that the College continues to add to the talented reservoir of innovative professionals who contribute to our state’s economy, and to the future viability of cities and towns east and west of the River.”

In addition to those accepting jobs after graduation, 25 percent of 2010 graduates are now enrolled in graduate programs. Of those, 35 percent are in medical school and nearly 10 percent are in law school.

The 2010 nursing class – 100 percent of which passed the NCLEX licensing exam on the first attempt – saw 98 percent of its graduates accept positions. Teaching graduates found the local market somewhat saturated and a number are working as substitutes or in related positions until positions open up.

As investments stabilized and the markets returned to a more regular rhythm, business and computer science graduates enjoyed better job opportunities than in the past several years. One hundred percent of graduates seeking jobs in human services reported accepting a position and more than 90 percent of graduates who majored in business or related fields now hold jobs related to their field of study.

“A 94 percent job placement rate speaks volumes about the caliber of Augustana graduates, the professors who nurture and support them and the value of our liberal arts curriculum,” said Sandi Vietor, director of the Career Center at Augustana.

Kristin Clark, a 2010 Augustana graduate and a native of Chaska, Minn. is one example.

Clark, 22, is working as a software and marketing analyst for Century Business Products, Inc., in Sioux Falls.

At Augustana, Clark majored in business administration and sport management. She says her job at Century allows her to apply the skills she learned in College.

“[In my position] I split time between doing marketing activities [such as] organizing email marketing campaigns, social media, working on our website [and] developing marketing materials, with helping to coordinate the software side of CBP.”

During her final year at Augustana, Clark completed an internship with the Sioux Falls Stampede hockey team which, she says, provided her valuable real-world experience.

“The amount of experience I gained in general business practice and operations, promotional/marketing strategy and customer relations while with the Stampede continues to be a valuable piece of my education.”

Augustana’s job placement rate for 2010 graduates is just above the placement rate for its 2009 grads, of which 93 percent reported accepting a position related to their major or chosen field.

“For the past 26 years, Augustana graduates have enjoyed a positive trend in securing employment as well as continuing their education following graduation,” Vietor said. “We know that employers and professional schools recognize Augustana graduates as strong leaders and creative thinkers who possess both a global perspective and a sense of responsibility to make the world a better place.”

Throughout each academic year, Augustana works to help students hone the skills they’ll need to secure jobs after graduation, including interviewing, resume building and networking.

One example is this Saturday’s “Real World:101” event, a free program designed for students and recent graduates that will discuss how to live successfully and independently after college. The sessions will include networking tips, financial management advice, career center guidance and professional success stories.

“Real World: 101” sessions will be held at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. in room 201 of the Madsen Center.